The remarkable rocket by oscar wilde

The title character and protagonist of "The Remarkable Rocket" is a firework who has a highly inflated opinion of himself. He considers all of the other characters with whom he interacts, the other fireworks, a frog, a dragonfly and a duck, to be his inferiors and criticizes them for not paying sufficient attention to him.

The remarkable rocket by oscar wilde

Taken from his The Complete Short Stories collection the story is narrated in the third person by an unnamed narrator and after reading the story the reader realises that Wilde may be exploring the theme of self-importance.

The rocket considers himself to be the best rocket there can be.

The Remarkable Rocket - Wikipedia

He also feels as though he is better than any of the other fireworks. If anything the rocket has no time for anybody else unless they are being complimentary to him. Not only does the rocket come from good lineage in his opinion but he also has more interesting things to say than anybody else. He is wrapped up in his own self-importance.

Without really listening to others or taking on board what others might say. He is better than anybody or anything else. Which may lead some readers to suspect that the rocket is in fact delusion such is his belief in his own self-importance.

Nobody is better than the rocket in the eyes of the rocket.

The remarkable rocket by oscar wilde

He can rise higher in the sky and looks better than the other fireworks. Which again may suggest that not only is the rocket full of his own self-importance but again he may be deluded.

When he is talking to the frog he longs to be able to speak all about himself yet the frog beats the rocket at his own game. Which may suggest that the rocket is not as unique as he would like to think he is.

There are others in the world like the frog who can better the rocket at his own game.

The remarkable rocket by oscar wilde

Firstly his tears dampen the gunpowder and the rocket will not go off and secondly he continues to sink into the mud which only leaves the rocket to get damper. If anything the tears and dampness from the mud may symbolically highlight failure.

The rocket also appears to thrive on the fact that he considers himself to be remarkable if not the best firework there is. Which would again play on the themes of self-importance and ego.

He also considers himself to be intellectually superior to the other fireworks though he has achieved nothing in the story to suggest he is. The rockets mind is clouded or awash with his own importance. If anything the rocket appears to be selfish.

There is nothing to make him special or different to any other rocket. The rocket lives in his own world or head and the only person that he is fooling is himself. He is too driven by his ego and sense of self-importance. The end of the story is also interesting as the rocket does get the opportunity to launch however nobody sees his ascent into the skies so nobody apart from the rocket can see how great or majestic he might be.

All throughout the story the rocket has considered himself to be the best firework yet nobody saw the rocket in the sky.

The two boys who placed him on the fire are asleep. The Prince and Princess are not there. Which may be the point that Wilde is attempting to make.

He may be suggesting that should an individual consider themselves to be better than others or to have an inflated opinion of themselves they will live a very lonely life.

Throughout the story there is a sense that the rocket has no friends which may be because he thinks of himself as being better than others.

The rocket wanted the world and the Prince to see him shine in the sky yet at the end of the story nobody saw the rocket fly.

The goat considers the rocket to be no more than a stick. As too did the two young boys who placed the rocket on the fire. Cite Post McManus, Dermot. The Sitting Bee, 18 Sep.Oscar Wilde online. Share Tweet The Remarkable Rocket. by Oscar Wilde. The King’s son was going to be married, so there were general rejoicings.

He had waited a whole year for his bride, and at last she had arrived. She was a Russian Princess, and had driven all the way from Finland in a . Every one was a great success except the Remarkable Rocket.

He was so damp with crying that he could not go off at all. The best thing in him was the gunpowder, . The Remarkable Rocket. From The Happy Prince and Other Tales () The King's son was going to be married, so there were general rejoicings. He had waited a whole year for his bride, and at last she had arrived.

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She was a Russian Princess, and had driven all the . The Remarkable Rocket. From The Happy Prince and Other Tales () The King's son was going to be married, so there were general rejoicings. He had waited a whole year for his bride, and at last she had arrived.

She was a Russian Princess, and had driven all the . About a prideful Rocket that loves the sound of his own voice. Things repeatedly go wrong, but he twist every negative word and even in a way to tickle his vanity.

Wilde was as selfish and vain as they came, so I suppose, you could say the Remarkable Rocket gives us a little glimpse at Oscar/5. In The Remarkable Rocket by Oscar Wilde we have the theme of self-importance, loneliness, failure, ego and delusion.

Taken from his The Complete Short Stories collection the story is narrated in the third person by an unnamed narrator and after reading the story the reader realises that Wilde may be exploring the theme of self-importance.

Short Stories: The Remarkable Rocket by Oscar Wilde